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Material Aid

Page history last edited by Social Policy Library 1 year, 2 months ago

 

1967

BSL’s Family Planning Clinic established in Fitzroy in July 1967 as a pilot project for low income families.  What had once been a ham & beef shop became in the 1960’s the first comprehensive Family Planning Clinic in Victoria; upstairs offices were provided for the expanding Community Aid Abroad and downstairs later became a new Material Aid Centre. [1]

 

1972

In preparation for the Family Centre Project, all BSL Youth & Children’s services discontinued and all workers given leave without pay and the option of returning to the new project in October 1972 (four did so). BSL Open Door policy discontinued except for people requesting material aid (clothing and furniture). No new social work cases were taken and staff of the Social Work Service were allocated to the Family Centre. [2] (end of January)

 

Sewing project started as an early part of the Family Centre Project, with mothers of families in the Centre producing clothing and linen for the families and for the Material Aid Service and improving social communication.

 

Material Aid Service established in Fitzroy at 75 Brunswick Street, replacing emergency relief by the social work department and providing clothing and furniture to low-income people in the inner urban area.  Based broadly on the "principles" of the Family Centre Project the service was innovative in comparison to other material aid services provided at the time, in that the main service aim was to provide material aid to vulnerable families on the basis of the social determinants of their need and not on their economic value.  The service expanded to provide material aid to people from all over Melbourne and country Victoria. [3]    A special auxiliary was developed to support the work of the service. (November) [4]

 

1973

The Christmas Toy Club operated from the Material Aid Department, with voluntary assistance, and approximately 700 children received toys. [5]

 

1974

Fitzroy Material Aid Group fundraising barbecue & pool party in March in Camberwell

 

1977

Material Aid helped nearly 300 refugee families from Lebanon, Chile, Timor and Cyprus, giving them large quantities of furniture and clothing as “in the majority of cases they had left their homeland with little else but the clothes they were wearing [6]

 

1979

Review of the Fitzroy Material Aid Service undertaken by Meg Montague recommended relocation, reorganisation and reorientation to emphasise the “educational, mutual support, participatory and skill sharing and acquiring aspect of the service” and building into programs evaluation and development so as to retain the “innovatory dynamic”.  [7] The review recommended that people with on-going need would ideally run a service for themselves as a resource exchange based on principles of reciprocity, self-help and community development while a small separate residual material aid service would continue to operate to meet the needs of clients in one-off' crisis situations [8] 

 

1981

The Sharing Centre for low-income people opened in Millott House (rear of 67 Brunswick Street), providing opportunities for low-income people to contribute their time and skills in shared activities and to participate in the provision of services such as cooking community lunches, packaging, pricing and ordering in the shop. The Sharing Centre expanded the role of the old Material Aid Service. [9]

 

1982

Review of the Sharing Centre, given the high demand by over 300 people each week,  led to splitting the developmental aspect of the project from the provision of residual support services.  An upgraded material aid service operated in Fitzroy with less discriminatory eligibility criteria, less rationing of goods and more choice.  The food shops became the Under Current Cooperative supported by the BSL and run by a community management committee. [10]

 

 1983

In a time of deepening recession, a major review of the Sharing Centre decided that the various activities could not be maintained under the same management and the service was split in April.  The shops selling second-hand and new goods became the Under Current Cooperative. The Material Aid Service continued to provide free essential goods to increasing numbers of people.

 

The Sharing Centre closed at the end of 1983 and the Material Aid Service moved to a shop at 79 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy. [11] 

 

Building at 75-77 Brunswick Street purchased, used as outlet for Material Aid 

 

1984 

Research undertaken to investigate the viability of the Brotherhood manufacturing low cost furniture.  Arising partly from the inadequate supply of furniture for Material Aid, this was seen as a potential innovative project to provide secure jobs for  long term unemployed people.  A furniture designer produced a range of prototypes. [12] 

 

The Material Aid Service introduced a shop providing essential new goods bought at factory prices and sold at a 20% reduction of the original cost, including the opportunity for lay-by.  This was to provide access to goods otherwise out of reach of a low income person’s budget and in a way that enhanced self-worth and dignity. [13]

 

1985

In the Financial Year 1984-1985, eleven thousand people used the Material Aid Service [14]

 

 

1986

BSL Peninsula Division launched on 15 September the first major appeal in the Peninsula Region for $600,000 with aim of supporting major redevelopment of cottages and the Resident Activity Centre at the G.K. Tucker Settlement, and the new Material Aid Centre in Frankston.  Appeal Patron - Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, with the Mayor of Frankston, Councillor David Triplow as Appeal chairman. [15]

 

Fitzroy Material Aid has a shop attached to the service selling new goods at a subsidised price 20% below the factory price (linen, pillows, blankets, doonas, electrical goods, baby clothes, runners, children’s school shoes).

 

The new Western Port Material Aid service opened in Kookaburra Street, Frankston (formerly the BSL’s furniture sales site) to serve disadvantaged people & families in the Western Port region (13 municipalities and shires) in December.  Based on the Fitzroy service - set up as a shop and operating on a minimal level of screening and assessment or users - access is to all residents of the region holding a pension or benefits card, low income earners, or those in financial crisis due to situations such as excessive private rental costs or sickness. In addition to used clothing and furniture, the service managed a small shop selling some essential new goods at wholesale prices. [16] 

 

1987

Fitzroy Material Aid service expanded to cater for greater demand in the catchment area

 

1990

A special Diamond Jubilee raffle was conducted to raise money for the Frankston and Fitzroy Material Aid Services and the Ballarat and Fitzroy Employment Action Centres, raising $66,418 additional net income [17]

 

1991

Frankston Family Services (established in early 1991) developed complementary programs to assist people attending the Material Aid Service, including teaching self-help skills and a recreation program focused on children in the 10-14 years age group [18]

 

Sales of low-cost new goods at Fitzroy Material Aid centre ceased and the funds were allocated to the new Emergency Relief Service in Whittlesea [19]

 

The annual blanket appeal was conducted for the Fitzroy and Westernport Material Aid Services, resulting in 3000 blankets and $10,000 in donations to buy new blankets. [20]

 

 

1992

Fitzroy Material Aid ceased selling a limited range of subsidised new goods to low income families in March and the funds were allocated to setting up the new Emergency relief Service in Lalor. [21] 

 

Ballarat establishes a separate material aid centre to accommodate the requests being received through the Employment Action Centre.  The service provided clothing, gift vouchers for the BSL “Big Bin” shop, referrals to other agencies for food, and financial assistance (including small loans and emergency financial relief) and advice to low-income people in the region. [22] 

 

BSL Central Highlands provided with funds by the St John of God Hospital, Ballarat, to pilot a Mobile Youth Support Services project, leading to an ongoing service established from a bus equipped with a kitchenette.  A material aid & support service operated four nights a week after 10 pm providing meals and food parcels, vouchers for clothing, blankets, support and referral services to young homeless people and other low-income people.  The aim was to make contact with homeless and ‘at risk’ young people and provide them with material aid, a contact point for support and referral to appropriate agencies.  A local business provided the majority of the food distributed from the bus. [23] 

 

Big Bin Material Aid Store opened by Hon Kay Setches, Minister for Community Services, at 96 Fyans Street, South Geelong in February [24]  following an extensive community needs study in 1991-1992 in light of the impact of the collapse of the Farrow Group in 1990.  In its first 5 months of operation assisted 2,773 families with clothing, furniture & household goods. [25] 

 

 Following 1991 investigation by Donna Ward, Emergency Relief service opened in the Whittlesea municipality (co-located with a service of Kildonan Homes in Lalor) - provided Financial aid, Referral service, Service information and Advocacy and also included a small Material Aid service run by volunteers [26]   (May) 

 

The Westernport Material Aid Service was incorporated into a wider Sharehouse project.  Frankston.  had seen a 163% increase in people seeking assistance since 1989 and was relocated to a larger building to allow a social support & referral component - self-help activities, visiting services, recreation program, outreach. [27]   (July)

 

A group of residents in Maryborough, Central Victoria, contacted the BSL in Ballarat (Central Highlands Region) out of dissatisfaction with local providers of material aid.  In response, emergency relief was given in form of vouchers, followed by grants ($2,000 to East Maryborough Neighbourhood Centre, $500 to the Salvation Army, $500 to the St Vincent de Paul Society).  Food was supplied by the BSL, Victorian Relief Fund & Food Bank.  BSL bins were placed in supermarket car parks and volunteers trained by BSL in Ballarat to sort clothing.  The group became known as Stable Aid auspiced by Central Victorian Community Health with material aid and opportunity shop as their ventures.  BSL worker (Teresa Arnold) assisted the committee to draw up a business plan    [28]

 

1993 

Whittlesea (Lalor) Material Aid Service, staffed by local volunteers, opened in a separate shop staffed by volunteers as a component of a broader Emergency Relief Service (December 1992-1993) [29]

 

The Sharehouse in its first full year of operation provided a link between materia relief and community support, conducting holiday programs, family camps, community lunches, coffee mornings with guest speakers and developed a  wide range of social activities.  The material aid service assisted 12,341 people (3% increase on the previous year) by providing clothing, blankets and essential household items.  Funds were received for operating costs of the Sharehouse from the Scobie & Claire MacKinnon Trust. [30]

 

Ballarat Material Aid service developed Creative Community Enterprises as a self-help skills exchange program for unemployed people which also involved them in producing  goods and services for income generation [31] 

 

1994

Review of Frankston Material Aid New Goods Shop led to closure of that service [32]

 

1995

The Peninsula region offered the JobSkills labour market program. Frankston Material Aid service moved to a central location in Frankston.  The No Interest Loans Program co-located, partially resourced by material aid staff, who reported the inability of the program to meet the vast demand. [33]

 

Whittlesea (Lalor) Material Aid Service, still staffed by local volunteers, supplemented by a coordinator employed for 9 hours per week.  The Emergency Relief service reported that major reasons for seeking help were linked to the high costs of utilities (gas, electricity, water and telephone), “demanding much time in advocacy and negotiation”. [34]

 

Thousands of toys gathered from the Christmas Wishing Tree appeal at 5 Kmart stores and from staff social clubs at a number of major corporations were distributed to families at material aid centres at Fitzroy, Frankston, Geelong, Lalor and Craigieburn  [35]

 

1996

Frankston Material Aid conducts first survey on education costs, also distributing basic information on Education Maintenance Allowance, Austudy and Voluntary School Fees. Results of the survey published in Brotherhood Comment. [36]  (January-April)  Additional consultation as part of the BSL’s Changing Pressures Project resulted in BSL Changing Pressures Bulletin No.2: State Schools - costs and dilemmas.

 

Frankston Furniture Works, a work experience and training program in making and repairing furniture for people unemployed for 18 months or more was launched on 16 May 1996.  It began as a six-month project funded by the Federal Government’s New Work Opportunities Program and supported by a local advisory group.  New and refurbished furniture was distributed at material aid outlets and sold through various retail outlets.  The project also developed and produced a range of new items including children’s furniture and toys and it was anticipated that sale of these through retail outlets might make the project self-sustaining [37] 

 

Social Action & Research conducted evaluation of two service areas:

 Case management evaluation - designed to assist services in the design and delivery of case management in the Brotherhood and to provide information for policy development in relation to case management

 Income support project - designed to contribute to future service directions in material aid, emergency financial relief and the no interest loans scheme and to strengthen advocacy work about income support needs of people on low incomes [38]

 

Fitzroy Material Aid service used by approximately 10,905 people in 1995-1996  [39]

 

Peninsula Material Aid supported 11,195 people in 1995-1996 (1,225 first-time users) [40]

 

Whittlesea Material Aid provided direct assistance to 5,255 people in 1995-1996 [41]

 

Whittlesea Emergency Relief assisted 1,388 people financially, distributing $60,000 of which $23,000 was from the Commonwealth Emergency Relief Program [42]  , gave material aid to 3,530 people and approved 45 new NILS loans in 1995-1996 [43] 

 

Fitzroy Material Aid Service increased its information and referral capacity through expanding and developing a computer-based information service to meet the face-to-face and telephone requests for services other than material aid [44]

 

 

1997

Following a review of Income Support Services, the Material Aid program in Fitzroy restricted to furniture only and BSL’s services (including the Toy service) in City of Whittlesea handed to other agencies [45]  (June)

 

Material Aid Frankston renamed “Just Essentials”  (October)

Just Essentials staff surveyed 300 families about water and energy costs (with assistance of SAR). [46]

 

A  season of two short La Mama productions by playwright by Daniel Keene, directed by Ariette Taylor, was presented in the Brotherhood's furniture warehouse in Fitzroy from 11 to 16 November.  The plays were Homeland and A Glass of Twilight.  Every review was favourable.  For the Brotherhood the exercise brought together two strategic elements - firstly, advocacy about poverty and secondly, a new theatre audience who may not otherwise have had awareness of the Brotherhood's work.    [47] (See also 1998)

(For details of cast and reviews see http://www.ausstage.edu.au/indexdrilldown.jsp?xcid=59&f_event_id=31252 )

 

1998

A second season of La Mama plays by Daniel Keene, directed by Ariette Taylor, was presented in the Brotherhood's furniture warehouse in Fitzroy from 18 February - 15 March.  With the theme of Poignant tales of the underclass, there were three components -  Neither Lost Nor Found / Untitled Monologue / Night, A Wall, Two Men.  Known as the Keene/Taylor Theatre Project Season 2, the outstanding reviews and publicity about the intent of these plays generated interest in the community, particularly those interested in the performing arts, resulting in an extension of the season from a three week to a four week season of six performances per week with a total audience number of over 1,000.  A third season, theKeene/Taylor Theatre Project Season 3 from 5-21 June, featured three plays - To Whom it May Concern, Custody and What Remains of Dying.  An unnamed reviewer wrote: "These plays quietly but insistently affirm an emotional intensity of suffering that is rarely acknowledged or given voice, in the lives of the humble poor."    [48]  (See also 1997)

(For details of the cast and reviews see http://www.ausstage.edu.au/indexdrilldown.jsp?xcid=59&f_event_id=32214  and http://www.ausstage.edu.au/indexdrilldown.jsp?xcid=59&f_event_id=60122 )

 

Joint venture with Anglicare Victoria opened at 75-77 Brunswick Street, incorporating an Anglicare Op shop, Food Service and Material Aid, with BSL furniture service continuing from rear of premises (24 March) [49]   

 

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Footnotes

  1. The address was between 73-79 Brunswick Street. BSL Annual Report 1967-1968 p.8. See Janet Paterson in Catherine Magree (ed.) "Looking forward, looking back: The Brotherhood's role in changing views of poverty 1993" pp.6-7 (BSL Library 362.506094 BRO). See also draft letter over name of Alison McClelland, Director - Social Policy & Research (18 March 1993) [McClelland_Draft_re_ClosureFamilyPlanningClinics_1993-3-18.pdf]
  2. Brief Outline of Family Centre Proposal 15 May 1972 pp.3 & 5 [BSL_Family_Centre_Proposal_1972-5-15.pdf]. These services had been providing material and financial aid as a casework tool. (Fiona Macdonald Brotherhood of St Laurence Income Support Services - Background 26 June 1995). See also Connie Benn The Family Centre Project - A Dynamic and Evolving Concept First Report November 1972 p.11 (BSL Library 362.82 BEN)
  3. Benn & Alderson 1972, p.2, cited in BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.11 [BSL_Income_Suplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf] See also Connie Benn The Family Centre Project - A Dynamic and Evolving Concept First Report November 1972 p.12 (BSL Library 362.82 BEN) See also BSL Annual Report 1972-1973 p.4 (no numbering)
  4. Connie Benn The Family Centre Project - A Dynamic and Evolving Concept First Report November 1972 p.12 (BSL Library 362.82 BEN)
  5. BSL Annual Report 1973-1974 p.5 (no numbering)
  6. Annual Report 1977 p.8
  7. Meg Montague Give and Take - An evaluation of the Material Aid Service, January 1980 p.88 (BSL Library 361.05 MON)
  8. Meg Montague (1980) cited in BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.11 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  9. BSL Annual Report 1981-1982 p.2. Also BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.12 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  10. Mary D’Aprano cited in BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.12 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  11. BSL Annual Report 1983-1984 p.3
  12. BSL Annual Report 1983-1984 p.8
  13. BSL Annual Report 1984-1985 p.3
  14. BSL Annual Report 1984-1985 p.3
  15. BSL Annual Report 1985-1986 p.5
  16. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) pp.14-15 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  17. BSL Annual Report 1991 p.19
  18. BSL Annual Report 1991 p.10
  19. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.12 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  20. BSL Annual Report 1991 p.8
  21. BSL Annual Report 1992 p.8
  22. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.19 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  23. BSL Annual Report 1993 p.9. See also BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) pp.20-21 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  24. Brotherhood Action Autumn 1992
  25. BSL Annual Report 1992 p.8. See also Beverley Blaskett (ed) Geelong Study Part 1 - Community Needs in Geelong 1992 pp.3-5 (BSL Library 361.1099452 GEE p.1). See also BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.19 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  26. BSL Metro Region Strategic Planning Working paper p.55 [BSL_Metro_Region_Strategic_Planning_WorkingPaper_Pt2_1995-3.pdf] and BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.23 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  27. BSL Annual Report 1992 p.8 and BSL Annual Report 1993 p.11. See also BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) pp.15-16 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf] See also the submission for funds containing rationale for the Sharehouse project [Sharehouse_Trust$_1993.pdf]
  28. Stable Aid - a research report by 5 Associate Diploma of Social Science (Welfare) students, Maryborough, Victoria, November 1994 [BSL_Central-Highlands_&_Maryborough_StableAid_1992-1994.pdf] See also BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.20 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  29. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.17 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  30. BSL Annual Report 1993 p.11. Re funding see submission and correspondence [Sharehouse_Trust$_1993.pdf]
  31. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.20 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  32. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.16 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  33. BSL Annual Report 1995 p.18. See also BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.16 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  34. BSL Annual Report 1995 p.18. See also BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) pp.18, 22-24. [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  35. BSL Annual Report 1996 p.40
  36. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.17 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf] See also Schooling Costs in Brotherhood Comment April 1996 pp.12-13 [Schooling_Costs_in_BSL_Comment_1996-4.pdf]
  37. BSL Annual Report 1996 p.16
  38. BSL Annual Report 1996 p.34
  39. BSL Annual Report 1996 p.18 states 10,019 people. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.14 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  40. BSL Annual Report 1996 p.18. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.17 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  41. BSL Annual Report 1996 p.18. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.18 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  42. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.24 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  43. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) Appendix - Data collection and service users [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996_Appx-Data.pdf]
  44. BSL Internal Working Paper No.2 Overview and History of Income Supplementation services in the Brotherhood of St Laurence (1972-1996) p.13 [BSL_Income_Supplementation_Services_1972-1996.pdf]
  45. BSL Annual Report 1997 p.10. For some context see Olga Estridge Furniture Programme Fitzroy August 1997 [Furniture_Program_Fitzroy_Future_Options_1997-8-27.pdf]
  46. Sally Jope in Our greatest strength - Consulting with service users for social action: The report of the Social Action Oriented Consultation Project (October 2000) [Consulting_with_service_users_October_2000.pdf]
  47. See Brotherhood Staff Link No.29, 11 November 1997. See also transcript of interview with actor Dan Spielman who had roles in the plays: "The work that Daniel (Keene) writes is often about dispossessed people or dead people or mad people - people on the fringes, that have been marginalised. Our work started with the Brotherhood of St Laurence, in their furniture warehouse in Fitzroy. So it was already out of the normal context for theatre. It wasn't a gig in the same sense. It had meaning. The people at the Brotherhood appreciated the work because it explored the reasons why people might end up needing that furniture or needing those emergency services." (from ABC Television "Sunday Arts" program 17 June 2007 14 December 2009). The Keene/Taylor Theatre Project won the award for Outstanding Contribution to Theatre (Green Room Awards, 1998) and the Kenneth Myer Medallion for the Performing Arts
  48. See Brotherhood Staff Link No.32, 16 February 1998 & Brotherhood Staff Link No.33, 6 March 1998. See transcript of interview with actor Dan Spielman who had roles in the plays: "The work that Daniel (Keene) writes is often about dispossessed people or dead people or mad people - people on the fringes, that have been marginalised. Our work started with the Brotherhood of St Laurence, in their furniture warehouse in Fitzroy. So it was already out of the normal context for theatre. It wasn't a gig in the same sense. It had meaning. The people at the Brotherhood appreciated the work because it explored the reasons why people might end up needing that furniture or needing those emergency services." (from ABC Television "Sunday Arts" program 17 June 2007 14 December 2009). The Keene/Taylor Theatre Project won the award for Outstanding Contribution to Theatre (Green Room Awards, 1998) and the Kenneth Myer Medallion for the Performing Arts
  49. For context of this decision see Olga Estridge Furniture Programme Fitzroy August 1997 [Furniture_Program_Fitzroy_Future_Options_1997-8-27.pdf]

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